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Blog

Tutus back @EveryDropCounts campaign as water supplies run out in Cape Town's

By: stagedoorscribbler - January 29, 2018

Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Photograph by Hattie Miles

 As a desperate water shortage threatens his home city of Cape Town, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his wife Leah are among high profile celebrities publicly backing the #EveryDropCounts campaign. 

The drought is so serious that the city is due to literally run out of water in April. 

#EveryDropCounts, launched last week, aims to raise awareness of the problem and educate people to use dwindling supplies responsibly.

 The message is simple: Don’t waste water. Don’t leave the tap running when you brush your teeth, take a shower rather than a bath and use washing up water to flush toilets. 

Many people take an unlimited water supply for granted and simply don’t appreciate the vast amount of water that is wasted when used without thought or consideration. 

Meanwhile the city is preparing for Day Zero - latest estimate is 12th April - with plans for 75 per cent of the city’s taps to be shut off and the emergency siting of 180 water collection spots at specially designated locations. 

With a proposed daily allowance of 25 litres per person, these will be monitored by police and neighbourhood watch teams and medical experts will be on hand in case of emergencies.

The SAPS, Metro police, law enforcement and SANDF have agreed to assist at WCSs and the City is hoping to involve community neighbourhood watches to monitor and assist residents at sites. Medical personnel will be present at all times in case of emergencies. 

Cape Town is now relying on winter rains and water from desalination plants to replenish the city’s supplies in the hope that full can be restored after an estimated three months of crisis measures.